Honours Entry

See Sub-Honours progression.

Induction

There will be various induction sessions in orientation week; see the orientation calendar for details. Attendance at relevant sessions on the Thursday is compulsory for Single Honours students. Attendance at other sessions is very strongly encouraged. Joint Honours students are strongly advised to attend as many sessions as possible, and to familiarise themselves with the contents of any sessions they miss.

Tutorials

Tutorials may be arranged by lecturers, to discuss lecturer-set problems, the coursework, lecture material, sample or past examination questions and other general issues relating to their modules. Students should take advantage of tutorials by preparing solutions to problems and thinking about the other issues carefully in advance.

Coursework

Honours students may use any of the School’s laboratories, though the John Honey Teaching Laboratory is sometimes scheduled exclusively for teaching.

Each individual piece of coursework has its own deadline defined in MMS. After this deadline, lateness penalties apply, and work may not receive formative feedback.

As already described, failure to achieve an overall coursework average of at least 4, taking into account lateness penalties, will result in failing a module without right to reassessment. In coursework-only modules, since no reassessment is available, an overall grade of 7 must be achieved.

See also target feedback timescales.

Reading Party

All Junior Honours students are expected to attend the two-day reading party. Senior Honours students are welcome if space allows.

Progression

For progression to Senior Honours, a student must have passed all their Junior Honours modules, and fulfilled the Faculty regulations regarding sub-honours credits. For progression to the final year of the MSci programme, a student must have passed all their Senior Honours modules with a weighted average of at least 13.5.

To switch from BSc Honours to MSci at the end of Junior Honours year, students must have passed all their Junior Honours modules with a weighted average of at least 15 at the end of semester 2.

External Examiner

The School’s External Examiner for Honours is Dr Iain Bate of York University.

Distinguished Lecture Series

All Single Honours students are required to attend all lectures in the Distinguished Lecture Series, as a compulsory element of modules CS3099, CS4099 and CS5199. Failure to attend is penalised by a deduction of one grade point from the appropriate final module grade, for each day of distinguished lectures missed.

Honours Projects

Project Library

There is a project library showcasing selected Junior Honours and Senior Honours project reports from previous years.

Junior Honours Project

Both team and individual reports should be submitted by the deadlines specified on MMS. The same team report should be submitted by each team member.

Individual reports should describe the role performed by the student within the team, and provide any relevant information about how problems within the team were dealt with. They should be no longer than 1,000 words.

Team reports should be no longer than 15,000 words, and should contain the following:

Section Content
Title Page Containing the title of the project, the names of the team members, “University of St Andrews” and the date of submission.
Abstract Outlining in about 100 words the work of the project overall and the team specifically.
Declaration “We declare that the material submitted for assessment is our own work except where credit is explicitly given to others by citation or acknowledgement. This work was performed during the current academic year except where otherwise stated. The main text of this project report is NN,NNN words long, including project specification and plan.
In submitting this project report to the University of St Andrews, we give permission for it to be made available for use in accordance with the regulations of the University Library. We also give permission for the report to be made available on the Web, for this work to be used in research within the University of St Andrews, and for any software to be released on an open source basis.
We retain the copyright in this work, and ownership of any resulting intellectual property.”*
Contents page
Introduction Describing the problem the team set out to solve and the extent of its success in solving it. The section should outline key aspects of the project for the reader to look for in the rest of the report.
Project details Summarising the achievements of the project, and discussing those aspects of the project that are of particular interest: the main ideas of the design, unusual design features, special algorithms and data structures, odd implementation decisions, novel user interface features, etc.
Evaluation and critical appraisal Evaluating the work with respect to the original objectives. The section should also critically evaluate the work with respect to related work done by others. It should compare and contrast the project with similar work in the public domain, for example as written about in published papers, or as distributed in software available to the team.
Conclusions Summarising the project, emphasising key achievements and significant drawbacks, and discussing possible future directions for the work.
Appendices Project objectives, specification, plan, and interim report as submitted during the year, followed by a list of changes that should be made in the light of experience, e.g. additional references, new software modules, changed specifications.
Testing summary Describing the steps taken to debug, test, verify or otherwise confirm the correctness of the various modules and their combination.

*Any request for permission to omit parts of the declaration should be directed to the project coordinator.

Senior Honours Project

The final project report will normally contain a main body and a number of appendices. The main body of your report will normally take the following form, although this may be varied if you and your supervisor feel it appropriate. Please bear in mind when reading reports from previous years that these guidelines may have changed over recent years.

Section Content
Title page Containing the title of the project, the names of the student(s), “University of St Andrews” and the date of submission. You may add the name of your supervisor if you wish.
Abstract Outline of the project using at most 250 words.
Declaration “I/we declare that the material submitted for assessment is my/our own work except where credit is explicitly given to others by citation or acknowledgement. This work was performed during the current academic year except where otherwise stated. The main text of this project report is NN,NNN* words long, including project specification and plan. In submitting this project report to the University of St Andrews, I/we give permission for it to be made available for use in accordance with the regulations of the University Library. I/we also give permission for the report to be made available on the Web, for this work to be used in research within the University of St Andrews, and for any software to be released on an open source basis. I/we retain the copyright in this work, and ownership of any resulting intellectual property.”
Contents page
Introduction Describe the problem you set out to solve and the extent of your success in solving it. You should include the aims and objectives of the project in order of importance and try to outline key aspects of your project for the reader to look for in the rest of your report.
Context survey Surveying the context, the background literature and any recent work with similar aims. The context survey describes the work already done in this area, either as described in textbooks, research papers, or in publicly available software. You may also describe potentially useful tools and technologies here but do not go into project-specific decisions.
Requirements specification Capturing the properties the software solution must have in the form of requirements specification. You may wish to specify different types of requirements and given them priorities if applicable.
Software engineering process The development approach taken and justification for its adoption.
Ethics Any ethical considerations for the project.
Design Indicating the structure of the system, with particular focus on main ideas of the design, unusual design features, etc.
Implementation How the implementation was done and tested, with particular focus on important / novel algorithms and/or data structures, unusual implementation decisions, novel user interface features, etc.
Evaluation and critical appraisal You should evaluate your own work with respect to your original objectives. You should also critically evaluate your work with respect to related work done by others. You should compare and contrast the project to similar work in the public domain, for example as written about in published papers, or as distributed in software available to you.
Conclusions You should summarise your project, emphasising your key achievements and significant drawbacks to your work, and discuss future directions your work could be taken in.

*To be filled as appropriate.

If there is a strong case for the protection of confidential data, the parts of the declaration giving permission for its use and publication may be omitted by prior permission of the Honours Coordinator.

The appendices to your report will normally be as follows:

Section Content
Testing summary This should describe the steps taken to debug, test, verify or otherwise confirm the correctness of the various modules and their combination.
User manual Instructions on installing, executing and using the system where appropriate.
Other appendices If appropriate, you may include other material in appendices which are not suitable for inclusion in the main body of your report.

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Last Published: 11 Jan 2018.